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Ideraway Creek Railway Bridge (Ideraway)

  • 600519
  • Mungar - Monto Line, Ideraway

General

Classification
State Heritage
Register status
Entered
Date entered
21 October 1992
Type
Transport—rail: Bridge—railway
Theme
5.3 Moving goods, people and information: Using rail
Architect
Pagan, William
Construction period
1906–1907, Ideraway Creek Railway Bridge (Ideraway) (1906 - 1907)
Historical period
1900–1914 Early 20th century

Location

Address
Mungar - Monto Line, Ideraway
LGA
North Burnett Regional Council
Coordinates
-25.58333174, 151.61588424

Map

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Significance

Criterion AThe place is important in demonstrating the evolution or pattern of Queensland’s history.

The deck-type pin-jointed fishbelly truss main span is unique in Australia. It is the only bridge of its type in Queensland and therefore the longest span of its type in Queensland. It innovatively re-uses the falsework of the Burdekin River Bridge at Macrossan of 1899 (This falsework had been re-used on two separate bridges prior to this one).

The bridge demonstrates the economies employed in the construction of Queensland's railways.

Criterion BThe place demonstrates rare, uncommon or endangered aspects of Queensland’s cultural heritage.

The deck-type pin-jointed fishbelly truss main span is unique in Australia. It is the only bridge of its type in Queensland and therefore the longest span of its type in Queensland.

Criterion FThe place is important in demonstrating a high degree of creative or technical achievement at a particular period.

It innovatively re-uses the falsework of the Burdekin River Bridge at Macrossan of 1899 (This falsework had been re-used on two separate bridges prior to this one).

The bridge demonstrates the economies employed in the construction of Queensland's railways.

Criterion HThe place has a special association with the life or work of a particular person, group or organisation of importance in Queensland’s history.

(Criterion under review)

History

Construction of the section from Wetheron to Gayndah began in March 1906 using day labour. Completion of the line was delayed building two bridges of special designs over gorges between Ideraway and Gayndah. The Ideraway Creek bridge was designed and drawings signed by Chief Engineer, William Pagan, on 10 December 1906. The extension was opened for traffic on 16 December 1907.

Description

The Ideraway Creek bridge is one of the most unusual bridges in Australia. It demonstrates the economic re-use of part of the erection truss used to build the Burdekin River bridge at Macrossan between Townsville and Charters Towers opened in 1899. The complete truss was 250 foot long whereas the Ideraway Creek bridge uses only 150 foot of the span. The pinned construction and multiple members of the truss were originally designed for rapid assembley and disassembley.

Wetheron embankment.

1x3x18 foot (5.5m) timber longitudinals, timber trestle, common timber trestle.

1x3x20 foot (6.1m) timber longitudinals, common timber trestle, common concrete pier.

1x4x150 foot (45.4m) deck-type pin-jointed fishbelly truss (ex Burdekin River bridge, Macrossan) with transom tops, six sets of two steel longitudinals, common concrete piers.

1x3x20 foot (6.1m) timber longitudinals, common concrete pier, common timber trestle.

1x3x18 foot (5.5m) timber longitudinals, common timber trestle, Timber trestle.

Gayndah embankment.

Image gallery

Location

Location of Ideraway Creek Railway Bridge (Ideraway) within Queensland
Licence
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)
Last updated
20 January 2016
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