Skip links and keyboard navigation

Old Bishopsbourne Chapel

  • 600255
  • 233 Milton Road, Milton

General

Also known as
St Francis' Theological College
Classification
State Heritage
Register status
Entered
Date entered
21 October 1992
Type
Religion/worship: Chapel
Theme
8.1 Creating social and cultural institutions: Worshipping and religious institutions
Architect
Dods, Robert Smith (Robin)
Builder
Hall & Myers
Construction period
1912, Old Bishopsbourne Chapel (1912 - 1912)
Historical period
1900–1914 Early 20th century
Style
Gothic

Location

Address
233 Milton Road, Milton
LGA
Brisbane City Council
Coordinates
-27.46737719, 153.0034417

Map

Street view

Photography is provided by Google Street View and may include third-party images. Images show the vicinity of the heritage place which may not be visible.

Request a boundary map

A printable boundary map report can be emailed to you.

Significance

Criterion AThe place is important in demonstrating the evolution or pattern of Queensland’s history.

Historically it is significant for its close association with the Anglican Archbishops of Brisbane for over 50 years, and with the theological college since 1936.

Criterion BThe place demonstrates rare, uncommon or endangered aspects of Queensland’s cultural heritage.

It is important for its rarity of function, fabric and setting in Brisbane, and remains an integral element in the historic Old Bishopsbourne [St Francis Theological College] ecclesiastical grouping.

Criterion DThe place is important in demonstrating the principal characteristics of a particular class of cultural places.

Old Bishopsbourne Chapel, erected in 1912, is significant as a building of outstanding architectural quality, and as a fine example of the ecclesiastical work of Robin S Dods.

Criterion EThe place is important because of its aesthetic significance.

Old Bishopsbourne Chapel, erected in 1912, is significant as a building of outstanding architectural quality, and as a fine example of the ecclesiastical work of Robin S Dods.

Criterion FThe place is important in demonstrating a high degree of creative or technical achievement at a particular period.

Old Bishopsbourne Chapel, erected in 1912, is significant as a building of outstanding architectural quality, and as a fine example of the ecclesiastical work of Robin S Dods.

Criterion HThe place has a special association with the life or work of a particular person, group or organisation of importance in Queensland’s history.

Old Bishopsbourne Chapel, erected in 1912, is significant as a building of outstanding architectural quality, and as a fine example of the ecclesiastical work of Robin S Dods.

History

The stone chapel at Old Bishopsbourne [St Francis' Theological College] was erected in 1912, replacing an earlier timber building of exposed studs designed by diocesan architect Richard George Suter and constructed about 1870.

Archbishop Donaldson, arriving at Bishopsbourne in December 1904, recognised the need to replace the original chapel, which had fallen into disrepair.

In 1912 Donaldson commissioned diocesan architects Hall and Dods to design a chapel which would harmonise with the house and grounds. Robin Smith Dods produced the design, and the chapel was constructed under his supervision by builders Hall and Meyers. It was dedicated in 1912.

Dods practised in Brisbane from 1896 to 1916. With this chapel he displayed a mastery of materials and form, proving that simplicity of construction and design can be as powerful as more elaborate structures.

Since 1936 the chapel has been carefully maintained by generations of St Francis' Theological College students. A loft and restored pipe organ, which were donated from a neighbouring church, were installed at the western end of the chapel in 1971.

While Anglican schools in Queensland generally have a chapel, few would be as old as St Francis', and even less would be of local stone.

Description

The chapel is constructed of Brisbane tuff, to a simple rectangular plan 70 feet [21 metres] by 20 feet [6 metres]. The ambience created is that of a medieval shrine blending with Queensland vernacular and derived stylistic elements of the early 20th century.

Eighteen inch [45 centimetre] thick walls with buttresses support a steeply pitched, slate-clad roof. The roof structure of six timber trusses is exposed.

The chapel is lit by long, narrow, Gothic windows in the bays between the buttresses. These windows are unusual in that the lower sections of the openings are unglazed, and are fitted with tongue and groove timber shutters to assist with ventilation and light.

A side porch projects over the entrance, which leads to a small vestry. This is divided from the entrance and interior generally by a timber screen.

The floor is 6 inches above ground level and is covered with red concrete. At the east end the floor originally rose to the sanctuary in the traditional five steps, but the top step has been removed to allow the altar to be detached from the rear wall and to stand free.

The chapel is simply furnished and displays a minimum of adornment. The sanctuary is panelled in silky oak, and decoration of the timber altar is limited to gilded motifs of Australian flora.

The loft at the western end has been installed sympathetically.

Image gallery

Location

Location of Old Bishopsbourne Chapel within Queensland
Licence
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)
Last updated
20 January 2016
  1. Is your feedback about:
  2. (If you chose ‘website’ above)

    Page feedback

    1. How satisfied are you with your experience today? *
  3. (If you chose ‘service’ above)

    Feedback on government services, departments and staff

    Please use our complaints and compliments form.