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Pancake Manor

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  • 600083
  • 10 Charlotte Street, Brisbane City

General

Also known as
St Lukes Anglican Church; St Luke's Anglican Church
Classification
State Heritage
Register status
Entered
Date entered
21 October 1992
Types
Religion/worship: Church
Retail, wholesale, services: Restaurant
Social and community: Hall—girl guide / scout
Transport—air: Office/administration building
Themes
8.1 Creating social and cultural institutions: Worshipping and religious institutions
8.3 Creating social and cultural institutions: Organisations and societies
Architect
Murdoch, John Smith
Builder
Steward, John & Co
Construction period
1904, Pancake Manor (1904 - 1904)
Historical period
1900–1914 Early 20th century
Style
Romanesque

Location

Address
10 Charlotte Street, Brisbane City
LGA
Brisbane City Council
Coordinates
-27.47211232, 153.02521252

Map

Street view

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Significance

Criterion AThe place is important in demonstrating the evolution or pattern of Queensland’s history.

St Lukes was purpose built as a hall with meeting rooms to assist the Church of England Mission in its role of providing Christian charity to the community and ministering to districts without parishes or churches.

St Lukes has religious significance as the Anglican Pro-Cathedral, 1904-1910, as the Mission Headquarters, 1904-1950s, and as the meeting place of the Synod of the Diocese until 1977 and socially significant as a recreational venue for Anglican youth groups and World War I and World War 2 veterans.

Criterion DThe place is important in demonstrating the principal characteristics of a particular class of cultural places.

The quality of its polychrome brickwork and picturesque roof forms make the building visually appealing, and is a successful example of a building designed to fulfil the dual purpose of both Mission headquarters and Church.

Criterion EThe place is important because of its aesthetic significance.

The quality of its polychrome brickwork and picturesque roof forms make the building visually appealing, and is a successful example of a building designed to fulfil the dual purpose of both Mission headquarters and Church.

The scale and materials of this building form a visual complement to the other buildings in the precinct, notably the red facebrick facades of John Mills Himself and the John Reid and Nephews buildings.

Criterion FThe place is important in demonstrating a high degree of creative or technical achievement at a particular period.

The quality of its polychrome brickwork and picturesque roof forms make the building visually appealing, and is a successful example of a building designed to fulfil the dual purpose of both Mission headquarters and Church.

Criterion GThe place has a strong or special association with a particular community or cultural group for social, cultural or spiritual reasons.

St Lukes has religious significance as the Anglican Pro-Cathedral, 1904-1910, as the Mission Headquarters, 1904-1950s, and as the meeting place of the Synod of the Diocese until 1977 and socially significant as a recreational venue for Anglican youth groups and World War I and World War 2 veterans.

Criterion HThe place has a special association with the life or work of a particular person, group or organisation of importance in Queensland’s history.

The church was designed by John S Murdoch who was commissioned by the Anglican Diocese of Brisbane to design St Lukes and Webber House in 1904.

History

This church was constructed in 1904. This site was purchased in 1903 by the Church of England for a new mission church. Prior to this, the mission had rented rooms throughout Brisbane and St Lukes provided its first permanent home. On 3 February 1904 the dedication stone of St Lukes Cathedral was laid by His Excellency, Sir Herbert Chermside, Governor of Queensland. St Lukes served as a temporary cathedral between the demolition of St Johns Pro-Cathedral, 1904 and the opening of St Johns Cathedral in 1910. Architect, John Smith Murdoch, was commissioned to design a church which would utilise fully the limited site area. Murdoch, who was an architect for the State Works Department (1894-1903); Chief Architect for Home Affairs (1919-22) and Chief Architect of the Commonwealth (1926-30) took leave of absence to design St Luke's and Webber House. St Lukes was purpose built for the Mission headquarters, providing meeting rooms in the basement. John Steward & Co constructed St Lukes which was dedicated on 14 August 1904 by the Administrator, the Venerable AE David, Archdeacon of Brisbane. On St Thomas Day, 21 December 1904 Saint Clair George Alfred Donaldson was enthroned as Bishop of Brisbane in St Lukes. The ceremony was well attended by prominent clergy members and as the church could only seat 402 people, entry was restricted to ticket holders only.

After 1910 St Lukes served its intended purpose as the headquarters of the Anglican Church Mission. The Mission was an evangelistic group which worked amongst the disadvantaged supplying food and shelter for the destitute and saving young girls from moral degradation. It also provided ministering to districts without parishes or churches. It ran several youth clubs, including the Newsboys Club, providing social companionship and spiritual guidance for the members. In 1908 the Overseas Girls Club was founded and later the hall was used as a meeting and recreational venue for the Girls Friendly Society. During the First World War Canon David Garland, resident Chaplain of St Lukes, was Director of the Soldiers Church of England Help Society and the Mission corresponded with servicemen at the front. An Anzac Club was opened at St Lukes for returned soldiers and the hall was used for Sunday teas and dances. On 18 June 1917 a Nurses Honour Board was unveiled in St Lukes War Chapel in recognition of those who served in World War I. During the Second World War St Lukes provided a meeting place and Saturday night dances for soldiers stationed in Brisbane.

St Lukes remained the Mission Headquarters until the 1950s and the meeting place of the Synod of the Diocese until 1977, after which St Lukes was no longer needed for church purposes. In 1979 St Lukes Church was converted into a restaurant.

Description

This is a finely detailed brick building in the Romanesque style whose predominant feature is the massive relieving archway containing vertical openings at the end of the chancel. It has a complicated roof form combining both hips and gables, along with a small octagonal tower near the entry. The roof sheeting is rolled iron. The plain brickwork is punctuated by bands of different coloured brick and the occasional use of stone around windows and doors. The building has the unusual arrangement of having entries to both floor levels at the chancel end in an attempt to optimise the building's orientation. The major entry to the upper church level is defined by a recessed porch.

The exterior and interior finishes of the building are particularly intact, despite the building's change of use, installation of kitchen facilities, and inappropriate interior door and external signage.

Image gallery

Location

Location of Pancake Manor within Queensland
Licence
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)
Last updated
20 January 2016
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